Inspriration Tues....Wednesday :)

Looong Holiday and some frightening events delayed the blog this week.  My apologies to anyone new and looking into this series.  I'll add an extra pic this week just for you!!

I live in Austin, TX and we had some torrential rain, lightning, and tornadoes as major storm cells collapsed over central Texas.  The storms have moved on but our little family was frightened for our lives briefly as the weather teams on tv said "If you live in this area, take your precautions for tornadoes now!"

We survived, the aftermath is lots of water, little destruction, and some cleanup downtown.  All in all, 11 people died and we pray for their families to get thru this with strength.  News stories can be found by #atxfloods on Twitter.  

This week I'd like to start with an image of Bryce Canyon.  This is a gorgeous and monumental park in Utah and the photographer captured an amazing snow dappled scene.  The key to this shot is the rich colors in the canyon coupled with the contrast of snowy scene.  Great depth and toning here and the image is sharp through about 2/3 of the way back and falls off into a nice soft misty cloud deep in the background. You can see more of their work at this link

Our next shot is a portrait and it really drew me in.  First off, shot at 2.8, it has a wonderful falloff.  We go immediately to her face as all good portraits do.  Her eyes should be sharp and they are razor in this image.  The colors of her hair and dress really pop in this image.  The photographer used a gradient blur in post to really accentuate the fall off from in focus to out of focus which actually works well here.  You can tell because even though it was shot at 2.8, the arms and dress are still on the same focal plane as the shoulder and head, only a few inches closer than her nose, but they are completely out of focus.  This kind of blur you would see at around 1.4 perhaps, but not at 2.8.  This takes nothing away from the image, it's a work of art.  See more of Ginger's work here 

Our 3rd image comes from Matthew Harris and it's from the editors choice page on 500px.  I chose this image because it's moody and dark.  Most food shots are very high key and shot at low depth of field.  This image has little depth of field but contains a lot of contrast and the spices are particularly sharp.  I love the color palette and toning used here.  The photographer aligned the spices almost in a color wheel pattern but threw us off with the third spice from left to right. The red pepper flakes make up a scattered array of ambiance and the spices bring in the order to the shot.  Having the whole peppers in the background makes for a complete picture.  

As promised, I said I would curate a 4th image here.  This final image is a black and white and it's gorgeous.  I love black and white when it's done right.  You must have a good contrast in the scene already before you just convert to black and white.  If you have too many bright colors you'll have lots of grey tones and it washes it out.  This image does not disappoint.  Simple subject yet powerful.  Shot with the legendary Zeiss 1.8 ZA lens on the Sony a7, this image has an earthy, raw feel, while being soft as it fades into the bokeh glory.  Using available light and shooting at f2 are the strong points here.  The photographer got the foreground and teapot sharp while letting the rest of the scene wander.  Lastly, it leaves you with some wonder about it.  Is someone settling in for breakfast?  Are two people sitting down to have a nice conversation soon?  Did someone get up from this table in a rush due to some news they received?  We'll never know, but we are excited now.    

Stay focused.